Transarterial chemoembolization vs. radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of single hepatocellular carcinoma 2 cm or smaller.

Posted by on 30 Sep 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Transarterial chemoembolization vs. radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of single hepatocellular carcinoma 2 cm or smaller. Am J Gastroenterol. 2014 Aug;109(8):1234-40 Authors: Kim JW, Kim JH, Sung KB, Ko HK, Shin JH, Kim PN, Choi HK, Ko GY, Yoon HK, Chun SY, Gwon DI Abstract OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for treating small (≤2 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). METHODS: This retrospective study consisted of 287 patients (mean age, 57.1 years; age range, 29-84 years; 221 men, 66 women; 73.5% with HBV; 100% with liver cirrhosis) with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer very early-stage HCC (≤2 cm single HCC) who were initially treated with TACE (n=122) or RFA (n=165). The primary study end point was overall patient survival. Secondary study end points were time to progression and tumor response. RESULTS: The RFA and TACE groups were well balanced in terms of baseline variables. The two groups did not differ significantly in overall survival (P=0.079) or major complication (P>0.999) rates. The respective cumulative survival rates at 1, 3, 5, and 8 years were 97.6, 86.7, 74.5, and 60.0% for RFA and 93.4, 75.4, 63.1, and 51.1% for TACE. Their objective tumor regression (complete or partial response) rates were 100% (165/165) and 95.9% (117/122), respectively (P=0.013). The median times to progression for RFA and TACE were 27.0±3.8 (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 19.6-34.4) and 18.0±2.9 (95% CIs: 12.2-23.8) months, respectively. RFA yielded a significantly longer time to progression (P=0.034). CONCLUSIONS: TACE may be a viable alternative treatment for ≤2 cm HCCs when RFA is not feasible. PMID: 24935276 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Transarterial chemoembolization vs. radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of single hepatocellular carcinoma 2 cm or smaller.

Traditional Chinese medicine and related active compounds: a review of their role on hepatitis B virus infection.

Posted by on 26 Sep 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Traditional Chinese medicine and related active compounds: a review of their role on hepatitis B virus infection. Drug Discov Ther. 2013 Dec;7(6):212-24 Authors: Qi FH, Wang ZX, Cai PP, Zhao L, Gao JJ, Kokudo N, Li AY, Han JQ, Tang W Abstract Since the significant public health hazard of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and obvious drug resistance and dose-dependent side effects for common antiviral agents (e.g., interferon α, lamivudine, and adefovir), continuous development of agents to treat HBV infection is urgently needed. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an established segment of the health care system in China. Currently, it is widely used for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in China and many parts of the world. Over a long period of time in clinical practice and in basic research progress, the effectiveness and beneficial contribution of TCM on CHB have been gradually known and confirmed. Based upon our review of related papers and because of our prior knowledge and experience, we have selected some Chinese medicines, including Chinese herbal formulas (e.g., Xiao-Chai-Hu-Tang, Xiao-Yao-San, and Long-Dan-Xie-Gan-Tang), single herbs (e.g., Phyllanthus niruri, Radix astragali, Polygonum cuspidatum, Rheum palmatum, and Salvia miltiorrhiza) and related active compounds (e.g., wogonin, artesunate, saikosaponin, astragaloside IV, and chrysophanol 8-O-beta-Dglucoside) and Chinese medicine preparations (e.g., silymarin, silibinin, kushenin, and cinobufacini), which seem effective and worthy of additional and indepth study in treating CHB, and we have given them a brief review. We conclude that these Chinese herbal medicines exhibit significant anti-HBV activities with improved liver function, and enhanced HBeAg and HBsAg sero-conversion rates as well as HBV DNA clearance rates in HepG2 2.2.15 cells, DHBV models, or patients with CHB. We hope this review will contribute to an understanding of TCM and related active compounds as an effective treatment for CHB and provide useful information for the development of more effective antiviral drugs. PMID: 24423652 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Traditional Chinese medicine and related active compounds: a review of their role on hepatitis B virus infection.

Dietary Supplement Use Among Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

Posted by on 18 Sep 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Dietary Supplement Use Among Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma. Integr Cancer Ther. 2014 Sep 15; Authors: Lee V, Goyal A, Hsu CC, Jacobson JS, Rodriguez RD, Siegel AB Abstract Background. More than 50% of US adults, and an even larger proportion of cancer patients, use dietary supplements. Since many supplements require hepatic metabolism, they may be particularly likely to cause toxicities in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, little is known about supplement use in patients with HCC. Methods. From 2008 to 2012, we gave newly diagnosed HCC patients at our institution a standardized questionnaire about dietary supplement use, demographic factors, and clinical characteristics. We then followed patients for four years or until time to death to examine the relationship with supplement use. Results. Of 146 patients, 71% had used vitamins and 45% herbal supplements. Most commonly used supplements were antioxidants (51%), multivitamins (46%), vitamin D (25%), and milk thistle (23%). People in mid-higher income brackets were more likely to use herbal supplements (19% of those earning <$30 000, 50% of those earning $30 000-60 000, and 34% of those earning >$60 000 used supplements). Hepatitis C (HCV) patients were more likely to use milk thistle than those without HCV (30% vs 13%, P = .03), and patients with hepatitis B (HBV) were more likely than non-HBV patients to use vitamin C (32% vs 14%, P = .01). Supplement use was not associated with overall survival. Conclusions. Like cancer patients in other studies, the majority of our HCC patients used dietary supplements. Supplement use was not associated with overall survival but should be studied in larger patient samples. PMID: 25228537 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Dietary Supplement Use Among Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

A comparison of three luminescent immunoassays for HBsAg quantification during the natural history of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

Posted by on 12 Sep 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

A comparison of three luminescent immunoassays for HBsAg quantification during the natural history of chronic hepatitis B virus infection. Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2014 Sep 10; Authors: Cheng XD, Song LW, Fang LL, Yang L, Wu Y, Ge SX, Yuan Q, Zhang J, Xia NS, Hao XK Abstract Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) quantification has garnered attention because of its high predictive value in determining treatment responses. HBsAg quantification assays, such as Architect and Elecsys, are commercially available, and more assays are in development. We aimed to compare the results of the Architect and Elecsys assays with those of a new assay, WTultra. The WTultra HBsAg assay is a sandwich chemiluminescent microplate enzyme immunoassay and provide an alternative choice which is more cost-effective and potential applicable in developing or resource-constrained countries and areas. A total of 411 serum samples were collected from patients during various phases of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection. The samples were assessed using the three assays, and the results were compared and analyzed. The Architect, Elecsys and WTultra assays were well correlated according to the overall results for the samples (correlation coefficients, rArchitect versus WTultra=0.936, rArchitect versus Elecsys=0.952, and rWTultra versus Elecsys=0.981) and the various infection phases (rArchitect versus WTultra range from 0.67 to 0.975, rArchitect versus Elecsys range from 0.695 to 0.982, and rWTultra versus Elecsys range from 0.877 to 0.99). Additionally, consistent results were observed according to genotype (genotype B: rArchitect versus WTultra=0.976, rArchitect versus Elecsys=0.978, rWTultra versus Elecsys=0.979; genotype C: rArchitect versus WTultra=0.950, rArchitect versus Elecsys=0.963, rWTultra versus Elecsys=0.981) and HBV DNA level (rArchitect=0.540, rWTultra=0.553, rElecsys=0.580). In conclusion, the Elecsys and WTultra assays were well correlated with the Architect assay, irrespective of the CHB infection phase or genotype. All of these assays are reliable for HBsAg quantification. PMID: 25209557 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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A comparison of three luminescent immunoassays for HBsAg quantification during the natural history of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

The immune tolerant phase of chronic HBV infection: new perspectives on an old concept.

Posted by on 02 Sep 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

The immune tolerant phase of chronic HBV infection: new perspectives on an old concept. Cell Mol Immunol. 2014 Sep 1; Authors: Bertoletti A, Kennedy PT Abstract Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection progresses through distinct disease phases that are strongly associated with patient age. The so-called immune tolerant (IT) phase represents the classical early phase of infection; it is associated with high levels of HBV replication and lack of clinical signs of liver Inflammation. Whether this phase of HBV infection is also associated with immunological features of “tolerance’ has recently been challenged. Here, we review the data that dispute this concept of immune tolerance and then propose an alternative interpretation of the immunopathological events that take place during this early phase of CHB infection.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 1 September 2014; doi:10.1038/cmi.2014.79. PMID: 25176526 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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The immune tolerant phase of chronic HBV infection: new perspectives on an old concept.

Assessment of Bone Mineral Density in Tenofovir treated Chronic Hepatitis B patients: Can FRAX identify those at greatest risk?

Posted by on 27 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Assessment of Bone Mineral Density in Tenofovir treated Chronic Hepatitis B patients: Can FRAX identify those at greatest risk? J Infect Dis. 2014 Aug 25; Authors: Gill US, Zissimopoulos A, Al-Shamma S, Burke K, McPhail MJ, Barr DA, Kallis YN, Marley RT, Kooner P, Foster GR, Kennedy PT Abstract BACKGROUND:  Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate (TDF) is an established nucleotide (NUC) analogue in the treatment of Chronic Hepatitis B (CHB). Bone Mineral Density (BMD) loss has been described in TDF treated Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients, but limited data exist in CHB. Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning was used to determine BMD changes in TDF exposed patients; we evaluated the accuracy of the FRAX score as an alternative to DEXA in clinical practice. METHODS:  170 patients were studied; 122 exposed to TDF, 48 controls. All patients underwent DEXA scan and demographic details were recorded. FRAX scores (pre & post-DEXA) were calculated. RESULTS:  TDF was associated with a lower hip T-score (p=0.02). On univariate and multivariate analysis, advancing age, smoking, lower BMI along with TDF exposure were independent predictors of low BMD. In addition the pre-DEXA FRAX score was an accurate predictor of the post-DEXA FRAX treatment recommendation (100% sensitivity, 83% specificity), AUC 0.93 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.97, p<0.001). CONCLUSION:  TDF treated CHB patients have reduced BMD, but limited to one anatomical site. Age and advanced liver disease are additional contributing factors, underlining the importance of multifactorial fracture risk assessment. FRAX can accurately identify those at greatest risk of osteoporotic fracture. PMID: 25156561 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Assessment of Bone Mineral Density in Tenofovir treated Chronic Hepatitis B patients: Can FRAX identify those at greatest risk?

Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) may have a negative effect on dendritic cell generation.

Posted by on 26 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) may have a negative effect on dendritic cell generation. Immunobiology. 2014 Aug 7; Authors: Hatipoglu I, Ercan D, Acilan C, Basalp A, Durali D, Baykal AT Abstract Hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be a serious worldwide health problem despite the use of protective HBV vaccines and therapeutic regimens against chronic HBV infection. Chronic HBV patients cannot induce sufficient immune responses against the virus. HBV and its antigens are believed to suppress immune responses during chronic infection. Hence, studying the role of HBV in immune suppression is very important for the development of alternative therapeutic strategies for HBV infections. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) on the generation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and the stimulation of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). In the presence of HBeAg, the ratio of BMDCs was decreased, but the ratio of CD11b(+)Ly6G(+) immature myeloid cells was increased. The expression of 47 proteins was also changed during HBeAg treatment; however, CpG-induced MHC-II expression on pDCs was not affected. Our results indicate that HBeAg may have a negative effect on the generation of DCs from bone morrow precursors. PMID: 25150150 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) may have a negative effect on dendritic cell generation.

Chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia: a proposal for a new subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma with unique morphological and…

Posted by on 12 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine, Others

Related Articles Chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia: a proposal for a new subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma with unique morphological and molecular features. Mod Pathol. 2013 Dec;26(12):1586-93 Authors: Wood LD, Heaphy CM, Daniel HD, Naini BV, Lassman CR, Arroyo MR, Kamel IR, Cosgrove DP, Boitnott JK, Meeker AK, Torbenson MS Abstract Hepatocellular carcinomas exhibit heterogeneous morphologies by routine light microscopy. Although some morphologies represent insignificant variations in growth patterns, others may represent unrecognized subtypes of hepatocellular carcinoma. Identification of these subtypes could lead to separation of hepatocellular carcinomas into discrete groups with unique underlying genetic changes, prognosis, or therapeutic responses. In order to identify potential subtypes, two pathologists independently screened a cohort of 219 unselected hepatocellular carcinoma resection specimens and divided cases into potential subtypes. One of these promising candidate subtypes was further evaluated using histological and molecular techniques. This subtype was characterized by a unique and consistent set of histological features: smooth chromophobic cytoplasm, abrupt focal nuclear anaplasia (small clusters of tumor cells with marked nuclear anaplasia in a background of tumor cells with bland nuclear cytology), and scattered microscopic pseudocysts–we designate this variant as ‘chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia’. Thirteen cases were identified (6% of all hepatocellular carcinomas), including 6 men and 7 women with an average age of 61 years. Six cases occurred in cirrhotic livers. Serum AFP was elevated in 6 out of 10 cases. There were a variety of underlying liver diseases, but cases were enrichment for chronic hepatitis B, P=0.006. Interestingly, at the molecular level, this variant was strongly associated with the alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT) phenotype by telomere FISH. ALT is a telomerase-independent mechanism of telomere maintenance and is found in approximately 8% of unselected hepatocellular carcinomas. In contrast, 11/12 (92%) of the cases of chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia were ALT-positive. In summary, we propose that chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia represents a new subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma with unique morphological and molecular features. PMID: 23640129 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia: a proposal for a new subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma with unique morphological and…

Natural Remedy to Prevent and Treat Cancer | The Next Generation

Posted by on 10 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Cervical Cancer

7:22 AM Abine Naufal No comments. Many herbs proven to prevent or treat cancer . Although the need to further research and development, a number of plants such as white turmeric, vinca, god leaves until the parasite has been used as a cancer patient endeavor to cure the disease. … Curcuma Curcuma Zeodaria combined with Mango can cure : 4. Cancer : cervical , breast, liver, lung, leukemia, brain and other diseases related to cancer and tumors. 5. Inflammation …

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Natural Remedy to Prevent and Treat Cancer | The Next Generation

Editing HPV's genes to kill cervical cancer cells – Medical Xpress

Posted by on 09 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Cervical Cancer, Others

Using CRISPR to silence the E6 gene in Human Papilloma Virus, Duke researchers were able to re-start the cervical carcinoma cell's natural self-destruct mechanisms, including the gene p53. Similar results … "Because this approach is only going after viral genes, there should be no off-target effects on normal cells," said Bryan R. Cullen, Ph.D., senior study author and professor of molecular genetics and microbiology at Duke University School of Medicine . "You can …

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Editing HPV's genes to kill cervical cancer cells – Medical Xpress

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