Assessment of Bone Mineral Density in Tenofovir treated Chronic Hepatitis B patients: Can FRAX identify those at greatest risk?

Posted by on 27 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Assessment of Bone Mineral Density in Tenofovir treated Chronic Hepatitis B patients: Can FRAX identify those at greatest risk? J Infect Dis. 2014 Aug 25; Authors: Gill US, Zissimopoulos A, Al-Shamma S, Burke K, McPhail MJ, Barr DA, Kallis YN, Marley RT, Kooner P, Foster GR, Kennedy PT Abstract BACKGROUND:  Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate (TDF) is an established nucleotide (NUC) analogue in the treatment of Chronic Hepatitis B (CHB). Bone Mineral Density (BMD) loss has been described in TDF treated Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients, but limited data exist in CHB. Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning was used to determine BMD changes in TDF exposed patients; we evaluated the accuracy of the FRAX score as an alternative to DEXA in clinical practice. METHODS:  170 patients were studied; 122 exposed to TDF, 48 controls. All patients underwent DEXA scan and demographic details were recorded. FRAX scores (pre & post-DEXA) were calculated. RESULTS:  TDF was associated with a lower hip T-score (p=0.02). On univariate and multivariate analysis, advancing age, smoking, lower BMI along with TDF exposure were independent predictors of low BMD. In addition the pre-DEXA FRAX score was an accurate predictor of the post-DEXA FRAX treatment recommendation (100% sensitivity, 83% specificity), AUC 0.93 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.97, p<0.001). CONCLUSION:  TDF treated CHB patients have reduced BMD, but limited to one anatomical site. Age and advanced liver disease are additional contributing factors, underlining the importance of multifactorial fracture risk assessment. FRAX can accurately identify those at greatest risk of osteoporotic fracture. PMID: 25156561 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Assessment of Bone Mineral Density in Tenofovir treated Chronic Hepatitis B patients: Can FRAX identify those at greatest risk?

Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) may have a negative effect on dendritic cell generation.

Posted by on 26 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) may have a negative effect on dendritic cell generation. Immunobiology. 2014 Aug 7; Authors: Hatipoglu I, Ercan D, Acilan C, Basalp A, Durali D, Baykal AT Abstract Hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be a serious worldwide health problem despite the use of protective HBV vaccines and therapeutic regimens against chronic HBV infection. Chronic HBV patients cannot induce sufficient immune responses against the virus. HBV and its antigens are believed to suppress immune responses during chronic infection. Hence, studying the role of HBV in immune suppression is very important for the development of alternative therapeutic strategies for HBV infections. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) on the generation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and the stimulation of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). In the presence of HBeAg, the ratio of BMDCs was decreased, but the ratio of CD11b(+)Ly6G(+) immature myeloid cells was increased. The expression of 47 proteins was also changed during HBeAg treatment; however, CpG-induced MHC-II expression on pDCs was not affected. Our results indicate that HBeAg may have a negative effect on the generation of DCs from bone morrow precursors. PMID: 25150150 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) may have a negative effect on dendritic cell generation.

Chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia: a proposal for a new subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma with unique morphological and…

Posted by on 12 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine, Others

Related Articles Chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia: a proposal for a new subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma with unique morphological and molecular features. Mod Pathol. 2013 Dec;26(12):1586-93 Authors: Wood LD, Heaphy CM, Daniel HD, Naini BV, Lassman CR, Arroyo MR, Kamel IR, Cosgrove DP, Boitnott JK, Meeker AK, Torbenson MS Abstract Hepatocellular carcinomas exhibit heterogeneous morphologies by routine light microscopy. Although some morphologies represent insignificant variations in growth patterns, others may represent unrecognized subtypes of hepatocellular carcinoma. Identification of these subtypes could lead to separation of hepatocellular carcinomas into discrete groups with unique underlying genetic changes, prognosis, or therapeutic responses. In order to identify potential subtypes, two pathologists independently screened a cohort of 219 unselected hepatocellular carcinoma resection specimens and divided cases into potential subtypes. One of these promising candidate subtypes was further evaluated using histological and molecular techniques. This subtype was characterized by a unique and consistent set of histological features: smooth chromophobic cytoplasm, abrupt focal nuclear anaplasia (small clusters of tumor cells with marked nuclear anaplasia in a background of tumor cells with bland nuclear cytology), and scattered microscopic pseudocysts–we designate this variant as ‘chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia’. Thirteen cases were identified (6% of all hepatocellular carcinomas), including 6 men and 7 women with an average age of 61 years. Six cases occurred in cirrhotic livers. Serum AFP was elevated in 6 out of 10 cases. There were a variety of underlying liver diseases, but cases were enrichment for chronic hepatitis B, P=0.006. Interestingly, at the molecular level, this variant was strongly associated with the alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT) phenotype by telomere FISH. ALT is a telomerase-independent mechanism of telomere maintenance and is found in approximately 8% of unselected hepatocellular carcinomas. In contrast, 11/12 (92%) of the cases of chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia were ALT-positive. In summary, we propose that chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia represents a new subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma with unique morphological and molecular features. PMID: 23640129 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Chromophobe hepatocellular carcinoma with abrupt anaplasia: a proposal for a new subtype of hepatocellular carcinoma with unique morphological and…

Natural Remedy to Prevent and Treat Cancer | The Next Generation

Posted by on 10 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Cervical Cancer

7:22 AM Abine Naufal No comments. Many herbs proven to prevent or treat cancer . Although the need to further research and development, a number of plants such as white turmeric, vinca, god leaves until the parasite has been used as a cancer patient endeavor to cure the disease. … Curcuma Curcuma Zeodaria combined with Mango can cure : 4. Cancer : cervical , breast, liver, lung, leukemia, brain and other diseases related to cancer and tumors. 5. Inflammation …

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Editing HPV's genes to kill cervical cancer cells – Medical Xpress

Posted by on 09 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Cervical Cancer, Others

Using CRISPR to silence the E6 gene in Human Papilloma Virus, Duke researchers were able to re-start the cervical carcinoma cell's natural self-destruct mechanisms, including the gene p53. Similar results … "Because this approach is only going after viral genes, there should be no off-target effects on normal cells," said Bryan R. Cullen, Ph.D., senior study author and professor of molecular genetics and microbiology at Duke University School of Medicine . "You can …

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Editing HPV's genes to kill cervical cancer cells – Medical Xpress

Menopause Awareness – Natural Menopause Remedies

Posted by on 09 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Cervical Cancer

… Menopausal Hormone Therapy National Heart, Lung, and. Awareness Months Calendar January Birth Defects Prevention Month Cervical Cancer Awareness Month Family Fit Lifestyle Month Financial Wellness Month.

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Menopause Awareness – Natural Menopause Remedies

Editing HPV's genes to kill cervical cancer cells | Science Codex

Posted by on 08 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Cervical Cancer, Others

Using CRISPR to silence the E6 gene in Human Papilloma Virus, Duke researchers were able to re-start the cervical carcinoma cell's natural self-destruct mechanisms, including the gene p53. Similar results were obtained against the HPV-E7 gene, turning on … "This method has the potential to be a single hit treatment that will dramatically reduce tumor load without having any effect on normal cells." The researchers are also targeting other viruses that use DNA as …

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Editing HPV's genes to kill cervical cancer cells | Science Codex

Is Your Body Toxic? The Whole Physique Cleanse

Posted by on 08 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Gallstone Alternative Medicine

The whole body approach can also be referred as a holistic treatment . A holistic treatment for gallstones incorporates your diet, lifestyle, supplements, vitamins and even natural remedies to treat this disease. A aloe vera colon …

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Is Your Body Toxic? The Whole Physique Cleanse

Cervical Arterial Dissections and Association With … – Edzard Ernst

Posted by on 08 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Cervical Cancer

Purpose— Cervical artery dissections (CDs) are among the most common causes of stroke in young and middle-aged adults. The aim of this scientific statement is to review the current state of evidence on the diagnosis and management of CDs and their statistical association with cervical manipulative therapy (CMT). … Email. Posted in alternative medicine , causation, chiropractic, osteopathy, spinal manipulation | Tagged alternative medicine , chiropractic, osteopathy …

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Cervical Arterial Dissections and Association With … – Edzard Ernst

Radishes, removes jaundice colour, treat loss of skin pigment, fluid …

Posted by on 08 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Cervical Cancer

Folate has shown effectiveness against cervical cancer . Digestive health Radishes are natural cleansing agents, terrific at breaking down food and ridding the body of excess toxins. Radishes can relieve indigestion, bloating and constipation and are useful in treating piles, or inflamed hemorrhoids. Diabetes Radishes are low on the glycemic index, which is good news for those managing diabetes. Healthy bones and teeth Vitamin C is essential for healthy gums.

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Radishes, removes jaundice colour, treat loss of skin pigment, fluid …

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