July 2017

Monthly Archive

Covariation Analysis of Serumal and Urinary Metabolites Suggests Aberrant Glycine and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Chronic Hepatitis B.

Posted by on 27 Jul 2017 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Covariation Analysis of Serumal and Urinary Metabolites Suggests Aberrant Glycine and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Chronic Hepatitis B. PLoS One. 2016;11(5):e0156166 Authors: Yang L, Yang X, Kong X, Cao Z, Zhang Y, Hu Y, Tang K Abstract BACKGROUND: Chronic hepatitis b (CHB) is one of the most serious viral diseases threatening human health by putting patients at lifelong risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although some proofs of altered metabolites in CHB were accumulated, its metabolic mechanism remains poorly understood. Analyzing covariations between metabolites may provide new hints toward underlying metabolic pathogenesis in CHB patients. METHODS: The present study collected paired urine and serum samples from the same subjects including 145 CHB and 23 healthy controls. A large-scale analysis of metabolites’ covariation within and across biofluids was systematically done to explore the underlying biological evidences for reprogrammed metabolism in CHB. Randomization and relative ranking difference were introduced to reduce bias caused by different sample size. More importantly, functional indication was interpreted by mapping differentially changed covariations to known metabolic pathways. RESULTS: Our results suggested reprogrammed pathways related to glycine metabolism, fatty acids metabolism and TCA cycle in CHB patients. With further improvement, the covariation analysis combined with network association study would pave new alternative way to interpret functional clues in clinical multi-omics data. PMID: 27228119 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Covariation Analysis of Serumal and Urinary Metabolites Suggests Aberrant Glycine and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Chronic Hepatitis B.

Hepatitis transmission risk in kidney transplantation (the HINT study): a cross-sectional survey of transplant clinicians in Australian and New…

Posted by on 22 Jul 2017 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Hepatitis transmission risk in kidney transplantation (the HINT study): a cross-sectional survey of transplant clinicians in Australian and New Zealand. Transplantation. 2017 Jul 21;: Authors: Waller KMJ, Wyburn KR, Shackel NA, O’Leary MJ, Kelly PJ, Webster AC Abstract BACKGROUND: Interpreting hepatitis serology and virus transmission risk in transplantation can be challenging. Decisions must balance opportunity to transplant against potential infection transmission. We aimed to survey understanding among the Australian and New Zealand medical transplant workforce of hepatitis risk in kidney donors and recipients. METHODS: An anonymous, self-completed, cross-sectional survey was distributed via electronic mailing lists to Australian and New Zealand clinicians involved in kidney transplantation (2014-2015). We compared interpretation of clinical scenarios with paired donor and recipient hepatitis B and C (HBV, HBC) serology to recommendations in clinical practice guidelines. We used logistic regression modelling to investigate characteristics associated with decisions on transplant suitability in scenarios with poor (<50%) guideline concordance (odds ratios, OR). RESULTS: 110 respondents had representative workforce demographics: most were male (63%) nephrologists (74%) aged 40-49. While donor and recipient hepatitis status was largely well understood, transplant suitability responses varied among respondents. For an HBV surface antigen positive donor and vaccinated recipient, 44% suggested this was unsuitable for transplant (guideline concordant) but 35% suggested this was suitable with prophylaxis (guideline divergent). In 4 scenarios with transplant suitability guideline concordance <50%, acute transplant care involvement predicted guideline concordant responses (OR 1.69, p=0.04). Guideline concordant responses were chosen less by hepatologists, intensive care doctors (OR 0.23, 0.35 respectively, p=0.01), and New Zealanders (guideline concordant responses OR 0.17, p<0.01; alternative responses OR 4.31, p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Despite broadly consistent interpretations of hepatitis serology, transplant suitability decisions varied, and often diverged from guidelines. Improved decision support may reduce clinician variability. PMID: 28731903 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Hepatitis transmission risk in kidney transplantation (the HINT study): a cross-sectional survey of transplant clinicians in Australian and New…

HIV infection, viral hepatitis and liver fibrosis among prison inmates in West Africa.

Posted by on 08 Jul 2017 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles HIV infection, viral hepatitis and liver fibrosis among prison inmates in West Africa. BMC Infect Dis. 2016 Jun 06;16:249 Authors: Jaquet A, Wandeler G, Tine J, Dagnra CA, Attia A, Patassi A, Ndiaye A, de Ledinghen V, Ekouevi DK, Seydi M, Dabis F Abstract BACKGROUND: Prisoners represent a vulnerable population for blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections which can potentially lead to liver fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis. However, little is known about the prevalence of liver fibrosis and associated risk factors among inmates in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: Screening of liver fibrosis was undertaken in a randomly selected sample of male inmates incarcerated in Lome, Togo and in Dakar, Senegal using transient elastography. A liver stiffness measurement ≥9.5 KPa was retained to define the presence of a severe liver fibrosis. All included inmates were also screened for HIV, Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection. Substances abuse including alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use were assessed during face-to-face interviews. Odds Ratio (OR) estimates were computed with their 95 % Confidence Interval (CI) to identify factors associated with severe liver fibrosis. RESULTS: Overall, 680 inmates were included with a median age of 30 years [interquartile range: 24-35]. The prevalence of severe fibrosis was 3.1 % (4.9 % in Lome and 1.2 % in Dakar). Infections with HIV, HBV and HCV were identified in 2.6 %, 12.5 % and 0.5 % of inmates, respectively. Factors associated with a severe liver fibrosis were HIV infection (OR = 7.6; CI 1.8-32.1), HBV infection (OR = 4.8; CI 1.8-12.8), HCV infection (OR = 52.6; CI 4.1-673.8), use of traditional medicines (OR = 3.7; CI 1.4-10.1) and being incarcerated in Lome (OR = 3.3; CI 1.1-9.8) compared to Dakar. CONCLUSIONS: HIV infection and viral hepatitis infections were identified as important and independent determinants of severe liver fibrosis. While access to active antiviral therapies against HIV and viral hepatitis expands in Africa, adapted strategies for the monitoring of liver disease need to be explored, especially in vulnerable populations such as inmates. PMID: 27267370 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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HIV infection, viral hepatitis and liver fibrosis among prison inmates in West Africa.

Management of Crohn’s disease in Taiwan: consensus guideline of the Taiwan Society of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Posted by on 04 Jul 2017 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Management of Crohn’s disease in Taiwan: consensus guideline of the Taiwan Society of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Intest Res. 2017 Jul;15(3):285-310 Authors: Wei SC, Chang TA, Chao TH, Chen JS, Chou JW, Chou YH, Chuang CH, Hsu WH, Huang TY, Hsu TC, Lin CC, Lin HH, Lin JK, Lin WC, Ni YH, Shieh MJ, Shih IL, Shun CT, Tsang YM, Wang CY, Wang HY, Weng MT, Wu DC, Wu WC, Yen HH, Wong JM Abstract Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. CD is rare in Taiwan and other Asian countries, but its prevalence and incidence have been steadily increasing. A steering committee was established by the Taiwan Society of Inflammatory Bowel Disease to formulate statements on the diagnosis and management of CD taking into account currently available evidence and the expert opinion of the committee. Thorough clinical, endoscopic, and histological assessments are required for accurate diagnosis of CD. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are complementary to endoscopic evaluation for disease staging and detecting complications. The goals of CD management are to induce and maintain remission, reduce the risk of complications, and improve quality of life. Corticosteroids are the mainstay for inducing re-mission. Immunomodulating and biologic therapies should be used to maintain remission. Patients should be evaluated for hepatitis B virus and tuberculosis infection prior to treatment and receive regular surveillance for cancer. These consensus statements are based on current local evidence with consideration of factors, and could be serve as concise and practical guidelines for supporting clinicians in the management of patients with CD in Taiwan. PMID: 28670226 [PubMed – in process]

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Management of Crohn’s disease in Taiwan: consensus guideline of the Taiwan Society of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

The Plasma and Serum Metabotyping of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Nigerian and Egyptian Cohort using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

Posted by on 01 Jul 2017 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

The Plasma and Serum Metabotyping of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Nigerian and Egyptian Cohort using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. J Clin Exp Hepatol. 2017 Jun;7(2):83-92 Authors: Shariff MIF, Kim JU, Ladep NG, Gomaa AI, Crossey MME, Okeke E, Banwat E, Waked I, Cox IJ, Williams R, Holmes E, Taylor-Robinson SD Abstract BACKGROUND/AIMS: Previous studies have observed disturbances in the (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) blood spectral profiles in malignancy. No study has metabotyped serum or plasma of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients from two diverse populations. We aimed to delineate the HCC patient metabotype from Nigeria (mostly hepatitis B virus infected) and Egypt (mostly hepatitis C virus infected) to explore lipid and energy metabolite alterations that may be independent of disease aetiology, diet and environment. METHODS: Patients with HCC (53) and cirrhosis (26) and healthy volunteers (19) were recruited from Nigeria and Egypt. Participants provided serum or plasma samples, which were analysed using 600 MHz (1)H NMR spectroscopy with nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy pulse sequences. Median group spectra comparison and multivariate analysis were performed to identify regions of difference. RESULTS: Significant differences between HCC patients and healthy volunteers were detected in levels of low density lipoprotein (P = 0.002), very low density lipoprotein (P < 0.001) and lactate (P = 0.03). N-acetylglycoproteins levels in HCC patients were significantly different from both healthy controls and cirrhosis patients (P < 0.001 and 0.001). CONCLUSION: Metabotype differences were present, pointing to disturbed lipid metabolism and a switch from glycolysis to alternative energy metabolites with malignancy, which supports the Warburg hypothesis of tumour metabolism. PMID: 28663670 [PubMed – in process]

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The Plasma and Serum Metabotyping of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Nigerian and Egyptian Cohort using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.