June 2018

Monthly Archive

Occult Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Review.

Posted by on 29 Jun 2018 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Occult Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Review. J Clin Transl Hepatol. 2018 Jun 28;6(2):155-160 Authors: Austria A, Wu GY Abstract Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (OCI), first described in 2004, is defined as the presence of HCV RNA in hepatocytes or peripheral blood mononuclear cells without detectable HCV RNA in the serum. Here, we aimed to review the epidemiology, diagnostic methods, clinical implications and potential management recommendations currently described in the literature, as well as the future directions for investigation of this entity. PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched with combination of the following keywords: “occult”, “hepatitis C virus”, and “occult HCV infection”. There are data to support OCI as a potential culprit in cryptogenic liver disease. There are also consistent data demonstrating the existence of OCI in specific populations, such as dialysis, human immunodeficiency virus-infected and hepatitis B virus-infected patients, and also in the general population. While the gold standard for diagnosis is liver biopsy, examination of peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a reliable, safer alternative method of diagnosis. Occult HCV infection is likely associated with liver fibrosis and progression of liver disease. Additional studies are required to determine the infectivity of OCI patients, as well as clarify the natural course and specific clinical implications of OCI. Lastly, studies are needed to determine whether treatment of OCI leads to decreased morbidity and/or mortality. PMID: 29951360 [PubMed]

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Occult Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Review.

A Case of Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma Acquiring Complete Remission of Target Lesion With Treatment With Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Posted by on 21 Jun 2018 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles A Case of Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma Acquiring Complete Remission of Target Lesion With Treatment With Traditional Chinese Medicine. Integr Cancer Ther. 2017 Dec;16(4):597-604 Authors: Jianxin C, Qingxia X, Junhui W, Qinhong Z Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most prevalent malignancies worldwide. Although surgery is known as the most promising radical treatment, a high recurrent or metastatic rate after surgery has limited its clinical efficacy. Sorafenib, a target agent, has seemed to be the only option for metastatic HCC patients to date, but none of clinical trials showed it could prolong the overall survival (OS) of advanced HCC to 1 year. How to prolong the OS and improve cure rate of HCC patients is still beset with difficulties. This report presents a rare case of recurrent HCC patient with complete regression of target lesion with 2 years of Chinese herbal treatment. A 64-year-old Chinese man with hepatitis B virus-associated chronic hepatitis presented HCC has been clinically diagnosed tumor relapse and omentum metastasis with computed tomography and α-fetoprotein blood test 4 months after surgery. It was decided the patient would receive traditional Chinese medicine treatment because of poor prognosis. After approximately 2 years of treatment, recurrent hepatic tumor and omentum metastasis have been found in complete regression. The patient remains alive over 31 months after relapse. PMID: 27444311 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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A Case of Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma Acquiring Complete Remission of Target Lesion With Treatment With Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Hepatitis B virus pathogenesis: Fresh insights into hepatitis B virus RNA.

Posted by on 09 Jun 2018 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Hepatitis B virus pathogenesis: Fresh insights into hepatitis B virus RNA. World J Gastroenterol. 2018 Jun 07;24(21):2261-2268 Authors: Sekiba K, Otsuka M, Ohno M, Yamagami M, Kishikawa T, Suzuki T, Ishibashi R, Seimiya T, Tanaka E, Koike K Abstract Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a worldwide health concern. While divergent factors are involved in its pathogenesis, it is now clear that HBV RNAs, principally templates for viral proteins and viral DNAs, have diverse biological functions involved in HBV pathogenesis. These functions include viral replication, hepatic fibrosis and hepatocarcinogenesis. Depending on the sequence similarities, HBV RNAs may act as sponges for host miRNAs and may deregulate miRNA functions, possibly leading to pathological consequences. Some parts of the HBV RNA molecule may function as viral-derived miRNA, which regulates viral replication. HBV DNA can integrate into the host genomic DNA and produce novel viral-host fusion RNA, which may have pathological functions. To date, elimination of HBV-derived covalently closed circular DNA has not been achieved. However, RNA transcription silencing may be an alternative practical approach to treat HBV-induced pathogenesis. A full understanding of HBV RNA transcription and the biological functions of HBV RNA may open a new avenue for the development of novel HBV therapeutics. PMID: 29881235 [PubMed – in process]

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Hepatitis B virus pathogenesis: Fresh insights into hepatitis B virus RNA.

Alternative splicing of hepatitis B virus: A novel virus/host interaction altering liver immunity.

Posted by on 06 Jun 2018 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Alternative splicing of hepatitis B virus: A novel virus/host interaction altering liver immunity. J Hepatol. 2017 Oct;67(4):687-699 Authors: Duriez M, Mandouri Y, Lekbaby B, Wang H, Schnuriger A, Redelsperger F, Guerrera CI, Lefevre M, Fauveau V, Ahodantin J, Quetier I, Chhuon C, Gourari S, Boissonnas A, Gill U, Kennedy P, Debzi N, Sitterlin D, Maini MK, Kremsdorf D, Soussan P Abstract BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) RNA can undergo alternative splicing, but the relevance of this post-transcriptional regulation remains elusive. The mechanism of HBV alternative splicing regulation and its impact on liver pathogenesis were investigated. METHODS: HBV RNA-interacting proteins were identified by RNA pull-down, combined with mass spectrometry analysis. HBV splicing regulation was investigated in chemically and surgically induced liver damage, in whole HBV genome transgenic mice and in hepatoma cells. Viral and endogenous gene expression were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Resident liver immune cells were studied by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. RESULTS: HBV pregenomic RNA-interacting proteins were identified and 15% were directly related to the splicing machinery. Expression of these splicing factors was modulated in HBV transgenic mice with liver injuries and contributed to an increase of the HBV spliced RNA encoding for HBV splicing-generated protein (HBSP). HBSP transgenic mice with chemically induced liver fibrosis exhibited attenuated hepatic damage. The protective effect of HBSP resulted from a decrease of inflammatory monocyte/macrophage recruitment through downregulation of C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) expression in hepatocytes. In human hepatoma cells, the ability of HBSP to control CCL2 expression was confirmed and maintained in a whole HBV context. Finally, viral spliced RNA detection related to a decrease of CCL2 expression in the livers of HBV chronic carriers underscored this mechanism. CONCLUSION: The microenvironment, modified by liver injury, increased HBSP RNA expression through splicing factor regulation, which in turn controlled hepatocyte chemokine synthesis. This feedback mechanism provides a novel insight into liver immunopathogenesis during HBV infection. Lay summary: Hepatitis B virus persists for decades in the liver of chronically infected patients. Immune escape is one of the main mechanisms developed by this virus to survive. Our study highlights how the crosstalk between virus and liver infected cells may contribute to this immune escape. PMID: 28600137 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Alternative splicing of hepatitis B virus: A novel virus/host interaction altering liver immunity.