November 2018

Monthly Archive

Anti-hepatitis B virus effects of the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia capillaris and its active enynes.

Posted by on 14 Nov 2018 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Anti-hepatitis B virus effects of the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia capillaris and its active enynes. J Ethnopharmacol. 2018 Oct 05;224:283-289 Authors: Geng CA, Yang TH, Huang XY, Yang J, Ma YB, Li TZ, Zhang XM, Chen JJ Abstract ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Artemisia capillaris (Yin-Chen) is a famous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for treating acute and chronic hepatitis in China. Enynes are one type of characteristic constituents in this herb, while their anti-hepatitis B virus (anti-HBV) properties have not been systemically investigated. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study is to reveal the active part of A. capillaris, and systemically investigate the enynes and their anti-HBV activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The total extract and each fraction of A. capillaris were assayed for the anti-HBV activity to reveal the active part. Bioassay-guided fractionation using various chromatographic techniques yielded the enynes, whose structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and ECD calculations. The anti-HBV properties inhibiting HBsAg and HBeAg secretions and HBV DNA replication were evaluated on HepG 2.2.15 cell line in vitro. RESULTS: ACT-2 and ACT-3 was revealed to be the respective active and toxic part of A. capillaris. Twelve enynes (1-12) involving four new ones (1-4) and two unusual enyne analogs (13-14) were isolated from the active part (ACT-2). All the isolates were assayed for their anti-HBV activity, and the preliminary structure-activity relationships were summarized based on the structural features. In particular, compound 4 could significantly inhibit the secretions of HBsAg and HBeAg, and HBV DNA replication with IC50 values of 197.2 (SI > 5.1), 48.7 (SI > 20.5) and 9.8 (SI > 102) μM. CONCLUSIONS: Enynes are responsible for the anti-HBV effects of A. capillaris. Hydroxyl and glycosyl groups are preferable for maintaining activity. This is the first time to systematically investigate the anti-HBV activity of enynes in A. capillaris, which provides valuable information for understanding the ethnopharmacological application of Yin-Chen. PMID: 29890315 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Anti-hepatitis B virus effects of the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia capillaris and its active enynes.

Altered oral microbiota in chronic hepatitis B patients with different tongue coatings.

Posted by on 10 Nov 2018 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Altered oral microbiota in chronic hepatitis B patients with different tongue coatings. World J Gastroenterol. 2018 Aug 14;24(30):3448-3461 Authors: Zhao Y, Mao YF, Tang YS, Ni MZ, Liu QH, Wang Y, Feng Q, Peng JH, Hu YY Abstract AIM: To elucidate tongue coating microbiota and metabolic differences in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients with yellow or white tongue coatings. METHODS: Tongue coating samples were collected from 53 CHB patients (28 CHB yellow tongue coating patients and 25 CHB white tongue coating patients) and 22 healthy controls. Microbial DNA was extracted from the tongue samples, and the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene V3 region was amplified from all samples and sequenced with the Ion Torrent PGM™ sequencing platform according to the standard protocols. The metabolites in the tongue coatings were evaluated using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) platform. Statistical analyses were then performed. RESULTS: The relative compositions of the tongue coating microbiotas and metabolites in the CHB patients were significantly different from those of the healthy controls, but the tongue coating microbiota abundances and diversity levels were not significantly different. Compared with the CHB white tongue coating patients, the CHB yellow tongue coating patients had higher hepatitis B viral DNA (HBV-DNA) titers (median 21210 vs 500, respectively, P = 0.03) and a significantly lower level of Bacteroidetes (20.14% vs 27.93%, respectively, P = 0.013) and higher level of Proteobacteria (25.99% vs 18.17%, respectively, P = 0.045) in the microbial compositions at the phylum level. The inferred metagenomic pathways enriched in the CHB yellow tongue coating patients were mainly those involved in amino acid metabolism, which was consistent with the metabolic disorder. The abundances of bacteria from Bacteroidales at the order level were higher in the CHB white tongue coating patients (19.2% vs 27.22%, respectively, P = 0.011), whereas Neisseriales were enriched in the yellow tongue coating patients (21.85% vs 13.83%, respectively, P = 0.029). At the family level, the abundance of Neisseriaceae in the yellow tongue patients was positively correlated with the HBV-DNA level but negatively correlated with the S-adenosyl-L-methionine level. CONCLUSION: This research illustrates specific clinical features and bacterial structures in CHB patients with different tongue coatings, which facilitates understanding of the traditional tongue diagnosis. PMID: 30122883 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Altered oral microbiota in chronic hepatitis B patients with different tongue coatings.

[Blood-borne occupational exposure and protection in medical staff of a traditional Chinese medicine hospital].

Posted by on 01 Nov 2018 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles [Blood-borne occupational exposure and protection in medical staff of a traditional Chinese medicine hospital]. Zhonghua Lao Dong Wei Sheng Zhi Ye Bing Za Zhi. 2017 Mar 20;35(3):205-208 Authors: Zhang ZG, Wei QX, Yang ZP, Wei QM, Wang XM, Wang XL Abstract Objective: To investigate blood-borne occupational exposure and related protection in the medical staff of a traditional Chinese medicine hospital, and to provide a reference for reducing the risk of blood-borne occupational exposure. Methods: Forty-eight medical workers with blood-borne occupational exposure in 2015 were selected to analyze the incidence of blood-borne occupational exposure, influencing factors, operations that caused blood-borne occupational exposure, pathogens, and occupational protection. Results: The incidence rate of blood-borne occupational exposure in the medical staff of the traditional Chinese medicine hospital in 2015 was 3.30% (48/1 455) , and the frequency was 0.04 time/person/year. The workers with blood-borne occupational exposure were mostly nurses, females, workers aged <30 years, workers with <5 working years, and workers with a junior professional title. There was a significant difference in the incidence rate of blood-borne occupational exposure between workers with different ages and working years. The main way of blood-borne occupational exposure was sharp injury (96.08%) . The main operations that caused blood-borne occupational exposure were covering or separating the syringe needle after injection and disposing used sharp instruments. The main exposure site was the hand (96.08%) , with the thumb and index finger for the left hand and the middle finger and index finger for the right hand; there was no significant difference in the exposure site distribution between the two hands (P<0.05) . The main pathogen that caused blood-borne occupational exposure was hepatitis B virus (68.96%) . The rate of correct local treatment for blood-borne occupational exposure was 88.24%. The rate of prophylactic medication was 74.51%, and hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) plus hepatitis B vaccine was the main way, followed by HBIG. In all workers with blood-borne occupational exposure, 62.74% did not wear gloves. Conclusion: The medical workers with few working years have a high risk of blood-borne occupational exposure, so the training on protection against blood-borne occupational exposure should be strengthened to reduce the risk of blood-borne occupational exposure and infection. PMID: 28511308 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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[Blood-borne occupational exposure and protection in medical staff of a traditional Chinese medicine hospital].

Pharmacologic Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder: a Review of Pharmacotherapy, Adjuncts, and Toxicity.

Posted by on 01 Nov 2018 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Pharmacologic Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder: a Review of Pharmacotherapy, Adjuncts, and Toxicity. J Med Toxicol. 2018 Oct 30;: Authors: Toce MS, Chai PR, Burns MM, Boyer EW Abstract Opioid use disorder continues to be a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the USA and the world. Pharmacologic treatment with methadone and buprenorphine has been shown to be effective at retaining people in treatment programs, decreasing illicit opioid use, decreasing rates of hepatitis B, and reducing all cause and overdose mortality. Unfortunately, barriers exist in accessing these lifesaving medications: users wishing to start buprenorphine therapy require a waivered provider to prescribe the medication, while some states have no methadone clinics. As such, users looking to wean themselves from opioids or treat their opioid dependence will turn to alternative agents. These agents include using prescription medications, like clonidine or gabapentin, off-label, or over the counter drugs, like loperamide, in supratherapeutic doses. This review provides information on the pharmacology and the toxic effects of pharmacologic agents that are used to treat opioid use disorder. The xenobiotics reviewed in depth include buprenorphine, clonidine, kratom, loperamide, and methadone, with additional information provided on lofexidine, akuamma seeds, kava, and gabapentin. PMID: 30377951 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Pharmacologic Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder: a Review of Pharmacotherapy, Adjuncts, and Toxicity.