April 2019

Monthly Archive

Mannose Phosphate Isomerase and Mannose Regulate Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Fibrosis in Zebrafish and Humans.

Posted by on 25 Apr 2019 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Mannose Phosphate Isomerase and Mannose Regulate Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Fibrosis in Zebrafish and Humans. Hepatology. 2019 Apr 23;: Authors: DeRossi C, Bambino K, Morrison J, Sakarin I, Villacorta-Martin C, Zhang C, Ellis JL, Fiel MI, Ybanez M, Lee YA, Huang KL, Yin C, Sakaguchi TF, Friedman SL, Villanueva A, Chu J Abstract The growing burden of liver fibrosis and lack of effective antifibrotic therapies highlight the need for identification of novel pathways and complementary model systems of hepatic fibrosis. A rare, monogenic disorder in which children with mutations in mannose phosphate isomerase (MPI) develop liver fibrosis led us to explore the overlooked function of MPI and mannose metabolism in liver development and adult liver diseases. Herein, analyses of transcriptomic data from three human liver cohorts demonstrate that MPI gene expression is downregulated proportionate to fibrosis in chronic liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatitis B virus. Depletion of MPI in zebrafish liver in vivo and in human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) lines in culture activates fibrotic responses, indicating that loss of MPI promotes HSC activation. We further demonstrate that mannose supplementation can attenuate HSC activation, leading to reduced fibrogenic activation in zebrafish, culture-activated HSCs, and in ethanol-activated HSCs. Conclusion: These data introduce the novel prospect that modulation of mannose metabolism pathways could reduce HSC activation and improve hepatic fibrosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 31016744 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Mannose Phosphate Isomerase and Mannose Regulate Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Fibrosis in Zebrafish and Humans.

Serum HBV RNA quantification: useful for monitoring natural history of chronic hepatitis B infection.

Posted by on 18 Apr 2019 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Serum HBV RNA quantification: useful for monitoring natural history of chronic hepatitis B infection. BMC Gastroenterol. 2019 Apr 16;19(1):53 Authors: Liu Y, Jiang M, Xue J, Yan H, Liang X Abstract BACKGROUND: As an alternative biomarker of intrahepatic covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) transcriptional activity, hepatitis B virus (HBV) RNA may evolve during long-lasting virus-host interactions during chronic hepatitis B viral infection. The distribution pattern of serum HBV RNA levels in the natural course of chronic HBV infection remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of HBV RNA during the natural course of CHB and the role in distinguishing the natural history of HBV infection. METHODS: A total of 291 treatment-naïve chronic HBV carriers were enrolled. Based on the clinical, biochemical, serological, and histological data as well as HBV DNA levels, patients were classified into the following four categories: the immune-tolerant phase (IT,n = 35), HBeAg-positive immune-active phase (EPIA,n = 121), inactive chronic hepatitis B(ICH,n = 58) and HBeAg-negative immune reactive hepatitis (ENH,n = 77). The parameters and distribution patterns of serum HBV RNA were evaluated in relation to viral replication status, immune phase, disease category and Child-Pugh class. The relationships between serum HBV RNA and other serum hepatitis B viral markers were also analyzed. RESULTS: Serum HBV RNA levels were significantly lower in the HBeAg-negative patients compared to those in the HBeAg-positive patients, with the lowest levels seen in inactive carriers. In HBeAg-negative patients, serum HBV RNA levels increased if there is reactivation to active hepatitis and showed obvious superiority for the combination of serum HBV DNA (cutoff>3.39 Log copies/mL) and HBsAg (cutoff>2.74 Log IU/mL) in discriminating between ‘HBeAg-negative immune reactive’ phase and inactive chronic hepatitis B phases of HBeAg-negative chronic HBV infection. Serum HBV RNA levels were positively correlated with serum HBV DNA and HBsAg levels in all chronic HBV-infected patients. A stratified analysis revealed that a correlation between serum HBV RNA and HBV DNA or HBsAg was present in HBeAg-positive patients; however, in HBeAg-negative patients, serum HBV RNA was positively correlated with HBV DNA only. CONCLUSION: During the natural course of chronic HBV infection, serum HBV RNA levels vary. Serum HBV RNA can act as a biomarker to predict the natural history of disease in chronic hepatitis B patients. In treatment-naïve HBeAg-negative chronic HBV-infected individuals, serum HBV RNA shows superiority in differentiating the ‘HBeAg-negative reactive’ phase. PMID: 30991954 [PubMed – in process]

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Serum HBV RNA quantification: useful for monitoring natural history of chronic hepatitis B infection.

Lacerated Liver Graft in an Open Abdomen Setting: A Case Report.

Posted by on 10 Apr 2019 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Lacerated Liver Graft in an Open Abdomen Setting: A Case Report. Exp Clin Transplant. 2018 12;16(6):765-768 Authors: Junrungsee S, Ongprasert K, Ko-Iam W, Lapisatepun W, Jirapongcharoenlap T, Boonsri S, Lorsomradee S, Chotirosniramit A, Sandhu T Abstract Donor scarcity is a primary problem in the development of a transplant program. The imbalance between an extremely increasing demand and the number of organs in the supply has led to an extended criteria donor approach. The successful use of donors with infectious diseases and septic shock has been reported. However, organs from deceased donors with traumatic abdominal injury and open abdomen are usually discarded due to risks of severe infections. Thus far, only 1 such case, in which a liver graft from an open abdomen was used successfully, has been reported. Herein, we report of a case of liver transplant using a traumatized liver allograft procured from a deceased donor with an open abdomen. The donor was a 16-year-old patient who had blunt abdominal trauma and severe head injury from a car accident, resulting in emergency laparotomy with suturing of the lacerated wound at the liver and abdominal packing. The donor was subsequently pronounced brain dead, and the family consented to organ donation. A multiorgan procurement was performed, and the liver was transplanted to 52-year-old patient who had multiple hepatocellular carcinomas. The postoperative course was without any infection or rejection. In conclusion, the use of donor livers with preexisting trauma in open abdomen settings can be used as alternative to expand the organ donor pool. PMID: 27211988 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Lacerated Liver Graft in an Open Abdomen Setting: A Case Report.