May 2019

Monthly Archive

[Study and opinion on toxicity of aristolochic acid].

Posted by on 07 May 2019 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles [Study and opinion on toxicity of aristolochic acid]. Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi. 2017 Nov;42(21):4049-4053 Authors: Gao Y, Xiao XH, Zhu XX, Liang AH, Zhang BL Abstract On October 18th, 2017, a research article named “Aristolochic acids and their derivatives are widely implicated in liver cancers in Taiwan and throughout Asia” was published on Science Translational Medicine. This article pointed out that herbs containing aristolochic acids could cause liver cancer by inducing the specific “aristolochic acids mutational signature”. The public was also suggested to avoid the intake of herbs containing aristolochic acids. Since 2000, CFDA has gradually abolished the medicinal standards for herbs containing aristolochic acids such as caulis aristolochiae manshuriensis, aristolochia heterophylla and radix aristolochiae. Related drugs have been strengthened supervision since then. Chinese Pharmacopoeia has also removed the records of a series of related herbs. State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine held a conference on the “toxicity” of aristolochic acids as soon as the article was published. After a discussion of the studies on the toxicity of aristolochic acids, experts attending the meeting discovered several problems, including the unclearness of exposure history, tumor-producing dose and latent period, the absence of some key factors such as hepatitis B, the small sample size, miscellaneous factors, incomplete evidence chains, the missing of analyses between data with huge differences, the insufficiency of fundamental research arguments, etc. In order to understand the toxicity of aristolochic acids and the carcinogenic risks, as well as guide clinical safe medication, the experts suggested that:①Complete the systematical evaluation of aristolochic acids carcinogenicity as soon as possible. Scientifically elucidate the relationship between aristolochic acids and the genesis of liver cancer. ②Establish medication risk warnings of aristolochic acids and strengthen the supervision. ③Make an in-depth study of the toxicity of traditional Chinese medicine. Find out the adverse effects of all traditional Chinese medicine step by step. PMID: 29271138 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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[Study and opinion on toxicity of aristolochic acid].

Chinese herbal medicine reduces acute hepatitis exacerbation in patients with hepatitis B virus infection: A case-control study in Taiwan.

Posted by on 03 May 2019 | Tagged as: Hepatitis B Alternative Medicine

Related Articles Chinese herbal medicine reduces acute hepatitis exacerbation in patients with hepatitis B virus infection: A case-control study in Taiwan. Complement Ther Med. 2019 Feb;42:248-254 Authors: Chen WL, Lin CH, Huang CC, Tsai CI Abstract OBJECTIVES: Little information is available about the impact of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) treatment on acute exacerbation of hepatitis. This study aimed to assess the risk of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma in HBV patients with and without CHM use. DESIGN AND SETTING: This population-based case-control study used data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2013. Newly diagnosed HBV patients had acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma as the case group, while another patients had no acute exacerbation of hepatitis and cirrhosis and hepatoma as the control group. To correct the differences in sociodemographic factors and Western medication use between the two groups, propensity score matching was used at a 1:1 ratio, and resulted in a comparison of 1306 and 805 patients per group, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Occurrence of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma. RESULTS: Overall rate of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma was 7.9% and 4.8%, respectively. Patients receiving CHM had a significantly lower risk of acute exacerbation of hepatitis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] =0.20, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 0.13-0.31) and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma (aOR = 0.29, 95%CI: 0.18-0.49) than those not receiving CHM after adjusting for relevant covariates. However, no dose-dependent relationship was exhibited for either incidence of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and cirrhosis and hepatoma. CONCLUSION: These findings highlight that the use of CHM was associated with a significantly reduced risk of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma in patients with HBV. Future research could further explore the benefit of CHM therapies for treatment of acute hepatitis exacerbation. PMID: 30670249 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Chinese herbal medicine reduces acute hepatitis exacerbation in patients with hepatitis B virus infection: A case-control study in Taiwan.