Related Articles General practitioners’ perceptions of vaccination controversies: a French nationwide cross-sectional study. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2017 Nov 02;: Authors: le Marechal M, Fressard L, Agrinier N, Verger P, Pulcini C Abstract OBJECTIVES: – We aimed to study general practitioners (GPs) perceptions of vaccines that have been the object of controversies in France. METHODS: – A cross-sectional survey in 2014 asked a representative national sample of GPs, randomly selected from the exhaustive database of health professionals in France, about their perceptions of the likelihood of serious adverse events potentially associated with six different vaccines: for two of them the association was based on some scientific evidence, whereas for the other four this is not the case. We performed a cluster analysis to construct a typology of GPs’ perceptions about the likelihood of these potential six associations. Factors associated with certain clusters of interest were identified using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Overall, 1,582 GPs participated in the questionnaire survey (1582/1712 GPs who agreed to participate, 92%). Cluster analysis identified four groups of GPs according to their susceptibility to vaccine controversies: 1) limited susceptibility to controversies (52%); 2) overall unsure, but rejected the association between Hepatitis B vaccine and multiple sclerosis (32%); 3) highly susceptible to controversies (11%); and 4) unsure (5%). We found that GPs who occasionally practised alternative medicine (OR=2.71 IC95%[1.65-4.45]), and those who considered information provided by mass media as reliable (OR=2.04 IC95%[1.65-3.99]) were more susceptible to controversies. CONCLUSIONS: – GPs had different profiles of susceptibility to vaccination controversies, and most of their perceptions of these controversies were not based on scientific evidence. PMID: 29104170 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Go here to read the rest:
General practitioners’ perceptions of vaccination controversies: a French nationwide cross-sectional study.